Support after a trial

Once you have given evidence or the trial has ended, there may be a variety of feelings and emotions that you might experience, such as relief, upset, anxiety or anger.

For victims of a crime, a ‘not guilty’ or ‘not proven’ verdict can be hard to come to terms with. You might find that you go over things that happened in the incident or trial in your mind. You might also find yourself spending time wondering what happens next – in or out of court.

If you’re experiencing any feelings or emotions like those described above or if you just don’t know what to think, then don’t worry. The way you are reacting is normal, especially after something as important (and possibly upsetting) as a court case.

After the trial, someone from the Procurator Fiscal’s office might get in touch to let you know how the trial concluded. You can always contact either the Procurator Fiscal’s office or the court and ask for the Criminal Desk if you wish to know the outcome. Please be aware that you will be asked for your name, address and possibly date of birth as well as the name of the accused and trial date before any information is given out.

It’s perfectly fine and understandable if you don’t want to know the verdict.

Victim Support Scotland can support you after a trial to inform you of your rights and empower you to move forward with your life.

First and foremost, we will listen to you and allow you the time to talk about your experiences. You will provide you with a trained supporter who has experience dealing with such cases and who can offer nonjudgmental support. We can provide practical help and information to guide your next steps, such as the Victim Notification Scheme.

Our service is independent, free and confidential*, so we will not discuss personal details with anyone else without permission.

*We will need to alert someone else if there is a safeguarding issue or a risk to others.

Whoever you are and whatever the crime, we’re here to help